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151
Keziah Hibbard and Caleb Bishop were ancestors of Lady Diana Spencer (Princess Diana).

Caleb Bishop & Keziah Hibbard > Lucy Bishop > Joseph Strong > Ellen Wood > Frances Work > Edmund Roche > Frances Burke-Roche > Diana Frances Spencer.

 
HIBBARD Keziah (I2446)
 
152
Lewis (Levi) J. 'Jake' Hibbard started for Texas from Cincinnati, Ohio with his parents, brothers and sisters in 1836. During the move they stopped in New Orleans, Louisiana on account of the invasion of Texas by Santa Anna. They arrived at the mouth of the Brazos River in Brazoria County, Texas in February, 1837 after the war was over.

He married Sarah A.E. (Sarabeth) Broadwater on May 13, 1860 in Harris County,
Texas and they had five children. He married Sarah MaeCunningham on March 29, 1890 and there are no known children of this marriage.

He appeared on the US Census Texas on June 1, 1860 #211-193, Stafford's Point, Ft. Bend County, Texas. He served in CW: Company A, Bates Batt, Brown's Regiment, Texas Vol in 1861.

He was a farmer in 1870 in Ft. Bend County, Texas. He appeared on the US Census Texas in 1870 Precinct 1 #238, Stafford, Ft. Bend County, Texas. He appeared on the 1880 US Census Texas District 2 #210, Burleson County,Texas.

He applied for his military pension for service at age 70 while living in Grimes County, Texas. He had lived there for 10 years. He stated that his occupation was a farmer and because of his age and physical condition that he was unable to earn support by his own labor. He had enlisted in the Confederate Army in Company A, Bates Battalion on April 10, 1861 and served until the close of the war.

His brother, Loran Hibbard at age 72 and residing in Stafford, Ft. Bend County, Texas, stated that he had known Levi Hibbard since he was a baby in New York and that he was now living in Navasota, Texas. He also stated that he knew Levi has served as a soldier in Company A, Brown's Regiment until the end of the war. Levi stated in September of 1899 that he owned no real estate property and had only about $10.00 in personal property. He appeared on the 1900 US Census Precinct 3 #345 and lived in Grimes County, Texas.

On August 4, 1903, he and his brother Loran Hibbard appointed T.D.Hennessy of Madison County, Texas to search, discover, take possession and sue for a 1/3 league of land originally granted to Lewis' brother, Lucius Hibbard February 16, 1838, about 5 miles west of the Trinity River and 12 miles north of the San Antonio Road. Hennessy was to receive 1/2 interest in the land for his services.

He and his brother Loran Hibbard sold two tracts of land in Leon County,Texas to T.D. Hennessy August 4, 1904. One tract was 1/3rd of a league known and designated as The Lucius Hibbard Survey that was patented October 8, 1845 and the other was 320 acres known as The Lovell E. Hibbard Survey, patented August 1, 1849.
 
HIBBARD Lewis (Levi) J. "Jake" (I328)
 
153
Listed as living in Enos Hibbard's household (other than family):
1875 N. Collins census: 1 domestic and 1 nurse: Kate Shugar 35-f, domestic, born Erie, single; Emroy Anice 31-f, nurse, born Erie, occupation-artist, single.

1900 census: Laitella Griffeth (?) f, servant, housekeeper.

1905 census: Litella ?, age 52, servant, US cit., housework and Almina Grifith, age 76, lodger, US cit.

Enos Southwick Hibbard witnessed Job Southwick's signature as the 1905 Census Enumerator for N. Collins on 19 June 1905. His signature, E. S. Hibbard, Justice of the Peace is on the last page of the 1st District of N. Collins, LDS-FHC file #0825703.

Book, History of Town of Concord, states:
Pg. 754- Enos S. Hibbard was born in North Collins, April 24, 1841, where he has ever since claimed residence. His father, Thomas S. Hibbard, was an old resident of North Collins, and died in 1881. His mother, Clarinda Southwick, was a daughter of Enos Southwick, Esq., of Gowanda.

Mr. Hibbard was married in 1867 to H. Josephine Hall, of Rochester, NY., who was born Aug. 14, 1846. They have six children, as follows: Hoyt R., born March 30, 1871. Howard G., born March 19, 1873. Irene, born April 4, 1875. Clarinda, born July 3, 1876. Fred L., born Oct. 21, 1878. Edgar H., born Sept. 11, 1880."

Pg. 731: "A. O. U. W., North Collins Lodge, No. 96 Organized June 9, 1877; number of charter members, twenty-seven; present membership, fifty. Original officers:--(Excerpt) E. S. Hibbard, Receiver.

Pg. 731: "E. O. M. A., Lincoln Lodge, No. 87 Instituted May 8, 1879. Charter members, twenty-two; present membership, sixteen. Original officers:--(excerpt) Enos S. Hibbard, Past President.

Excerpt from pg. 17 of NORTH COLLINS REMEMBERED by Ethelyn Weller, published in 1941 just prior to WW2: Enos' son Hoyt had five children, Helen, Darwin, father of Dee and Thomas of North Collins, Harlan, Hamilton and Hoyt, Jr. Howard had one son, Sherman, who died at an early age, Fred, not married, is a patient at the Batavia Veterans' Hospital; Edgar married Edith Brown, daughter of D. C. Brown, and they live in Buffalo. Hamilton married Gwendolyn Burk, daughter of Howard Burk; Harlan married Lorraine Conrad, daughter of Mrs. Minnie Conrad. They live in Gowanda."

CORRECTIONS TO ABOVE PARAGRAPH, as follows, per Tom G. Hibbard, July 1995: 1) Thomas Hibbard's name is actually TOM. 2) Harlan- name is Harland. 3) Omitted Hoyt, Jr's. Marriage - Hoyt, Jr. married Florence Burns.

Hibbard's (Enos & H. Josephine) impressive cemetery monument in N. Collins Cemetery looks like a cube set on end on top of another base. It is solid granite; an iron bar goes down through the base for support. Explained to Mary (Hibbard) Stack in July 1996 by Grace Korthols, N.Collins Historian.
 
Family F947
 
154
Listed as living in Enos Hibbard's household (other than family): 1875 N. Collins census: 1 domestic and 1 nurse: Kate Shugar 35-f, domestic, born Erie, single; Emroy Anice 31-f, nurse, born Erie, occupation-artist, single.

1900 census: Laitella Griffeth (?) f, servant, housekeeper.

1905 census: Litella ?, age 52, servant, US cit., housework and Almina Grifith, age 76, lodger, US cit.

Enos Southwick Hibbard witnessed Job Southwick's signature as the 1905 Census Enumerator for N. Collins on 19 June 1905. His signature, E. S. Hibbard, Justice of the Peace is on the last page of the 1st District of N. Collins, LDS-FHC file #0825703.

Book, History of Town of Concord, states: Pg. 754- Enos S. Hibbard was born in North Collins, April 24, 1841, where he has ever since claimed residence. His father, Thomas S. Hibbard, was an old resident of North Collins, and died in 1881. His mother, Clarinda Southwick, was a daughter of Enos Southwick, Esq., of Gowanda.

Mr. Hibbard was married in 1867 to H. Josephine Hall, of Rochester, NY., who was born Aug. 14, 1846. They have six children, as follows: Hoyt R., born March 30, 1871. Howard G., born March 19, 1873. Irene, born April 4, 1875. Clarinda, born July 3, 1876. Fred L., born Oct. 21, 1878. Edgar H., born Sept. 11, 1880."

Pg. 731: "A. O. U. W., North Collins Lodge, No. 96 Organized June 9, 1877; number of charter members, twenty-seven; present membership, fifty. Original officers:--(Excerpt) E. S. Hibbard, Receiver.

Pg. 731: "E. O. M. A., Lincoln Lodge, No. 87 Instituted May 8, 1879. Charter members, twenty-two; present membership, sixteen. Original officers:--(excerpt) Enos S. Hibbard, Past President.

Excerpt from pg. 17 of NORTH COLLINS REMEMBERED by Ethelyn Weller, published in 1941 just prior to WW2: Enos' son Hoyt had five children, Helen, Darwin, father of Dee and Thomas of North Collins, Harlan, Hamilton and Hoyt, Jr. Howard had one son, Sherman, who died at an early age, Fred, not married, is a patient at the Batavia Veterans' Hospital; Edgar married Edith Brown, daughter of D. C. Brown, and they live in Buffalo. Hamilton married Gwendolyn Burk, daughter of Howard Burk; Harlan married Lorraine Conrad, daughter of Mrs. Minnie Conrad. They live in Gowanda."

CORRECTIONS TO ABOVE PARAGRAPH, as follows, per Tom G. Hibbard, July 1995: 1) Thomas Hibbard's name is actually TOM. 2) Harlan- name is Harland. 3) Omitted Hoyt, Jr's. Marriage - Hoyt, Jr. married Florence Burns.

Hibbard's (Enos & H. Josephine) impressive cemetery monument in N. Collins Cemetery looks like a cube set on end on top of another base. It is solid granite; an iron bar goes down through the base for support. Explained to Mary (Hibbard) Stack in July 1996 by Grace Korthols, N.Collins Historian.
 
HIBBARD Enos Southwick (I2917)
 
155
Lived in Litchfield, CT. Buried in Mt. Elliot Cemetery, Detroit, MI

Individual Record FamilySearch™ U.S. Social Security Death Index
30 September 2000
Select record to download - Maximum: 50
Harriett HIBBARD
Birth Date: 16 Apr 1889
Death Date: Apr 1976
Social Security Number: 040-38-2641
State or Territory Where Number Was Issued: Connecticut

Death Residence Localities
ZIP Code: 06759
Localities: Litchfield, Litchfield, Connecticut

Unknown Birth. ?? Carrie said she had only one child.

Hibbard Births
lora1957 (View posts) Posted: 15 Apr 2002 11:07PM

Classification: Birth
Surnames: Hibbard,Gray,Morris,Christy,Jenkins,Bennett,Hardy,Sanger,Lauer,Class,Ervin,Irwin,Class,Jenkins,
Surname,Child Given Name,Father Given Name,Mother Given Name,Maiden Name,Sex,Color,Month,Day,Year,County,Book,Page


HIBBARD,---,CARL,FANNY,HARDY,F,W,OCT,26,1916,STJOSEPH,CH-36,34,4187,
HIBBARD,---,DALE,SALLIE,LAUER,F,W,JAN,11,1890,VANDERBURGH,CH-V3,195,4253,
HIBBARD,---,J L,HARRIETT,SANGER,-,W,JUL,30,1918,STJOSEPH,CH-38,341,4187,
HIBBARD,---,JOHN,ROSE L,IRWIN,M,W,JUL,15,1906,BARTHOLOMEW,H-11,6,3823,
HIBBARD,---,JOHN A,MOLLIE,CARBOTT,F,W,APR,9,1885,STJOSEPH,CH-23,83,4187,
HIBBARD,---,L D,BARTHA,EVANS,M,W,AUG,9,1882,MARION,H-1,95,4074,
HIBBARD,---,THOMAS,NELLIE,CRISTY,F,W,AUG,30,1906,BARTHOLOMEW,1-H-3,1,3823,
HIBBARD,---,W H,LOTA,CLASS,M,W,JUL,1,1896,HUNTINGTON,CH-1,7,3985,
HIBBARD,---,WILLIAM,ROSE,ERVIN,F,W,JUL,12,1904,BARTHOLOMEW,H-10,???,3823,
HIBBARD,---,WM,ROSE,ERWIN,M,W,OCT,4,1902,BARTHOLOMEW,H-9,???,3823,
HIBBARD,---,WM H,CELESTA,CLASS,F,W,MAR,22,1893,HUNTINGTON,H-7,12,3985,
HIBBARD,---,WM H,FRETA,CLASS,M,W,JUL,1,1896,HUNTINGTON,H-8,13,3985,
HIBBARD,BETTY J,WALTER A,CLAIRE,GRAY,F,W,JUL,25,1920,CLINTON,H-11,72,3871,
HIBBARD,CARL L,CARL C,HENNIE F,HARDY,M,W,DEC,4,1919,STJOSEPH,CH-38,9,4187,
HIBBARD,CHRISTINA M,JOHN S,GRACE,BENNETT,F,W,OCT,9,1907,BARTHOLOMEW,CH-3,1?,3823,
HIBBARD,FLOYD LEE,WILLIAM,ROSE,ERWIN,M,W,AUG,2,1912,BARTHOLOMEW,1-H-2,9,3823,
HIBBARD,HELEN J,LEWIS I,MARY K,JENKINS,F,W,JAN,1,1917,CLINTON,H-10,266,3871,
HIBBARD,HOWARD R,LEWIS C,MARY K,JENKINS,M,W,OCT,8,1918,CLINTON,H-10,388,3871,
HIBBARD,JEANNETTA G,JOHN,GRACE,BENNETT,F,W,AUG,15,1916,BARTHOLOMEW,CH-7,7,3823,
HIBBARD,LOUISE G,WALTER,CLAIRE,GRAY,F,W,NOV,17,1913,CLINTON,H-10,52,3871,
HIBBARD,MAGGIE MAY,THOMAS,NELLIE,CHRISTY,F,W,AUG,30,1906,BARTHOLOMEW,H-11,9,3823,
HIBBARD,RICHARD,JAS,ALICE,MORRIS,M,W,AUG,12,1900,WASHINGTON,H-3,13,4309,
HIBBARD,WILLIAM K,WALTER A,CLAIRE,GRAY,M,W,NOV,24,1915,CLINTON,H-10,188,3871, 
SANGER Harriett L. (I01269)
 
156
Loran H. "Judge" Hibbard was born December 19, 1827. The spelling of Loran's name varies. In May 1888 Loran wrote a letter and clearly signed his name "Loran Hibbard" [this is the signature in the photo], but there are other references to him with different spellings (Lorin, Loron Loren Lauren, Lorain, Lorain, Lorene, L., Hibbard and Hibberd).

Mary Hibbard-Shelton, Loran's granddaughter, the daughter of his son, George Andrew Hibbard, said that Loran was born in Ireland. Other sources indicate that he was born in New York. It may be that he was born in Ireland and moved to New York when he was very young.

During a move to Texas from Cincinnati, Ohio in 1836 along with his parents Elmer and Lydia and his brothers and sisters, Elmer and Lydia stopped in New Orleans on account of the invasion of Texas by Santa Anna. They arrived at the mouth of the Brazos River in Brazoria County, Texas in February, 1837 after the war was over.

His brothers Lovell Hibbard and Lucius Hibbard were Sam Houston's musicians during the Mexican War and played the General's favorite march, "Come To The Bower", by which the Texans marched away from their camp to meet the Mexican invaders and won the Battle of San Jacinto.

Loran was described as being 6' tall and was a professional carpenter by trade. He also drove a covered freight wagon, making enough money by this employment to buy 20 acres of land from a man named Huffman. He cultivated the land and helped make a living for his mother and deeded the land to her. He later bought more land and raised stock. In 1858 he bought 20 acres of land in Ft. Bend County, Texas for $20.00 from Liddia (Lydia) Hibbard, formerly sold to her by John Jameson, and originally granted to F.P. Hoffman. At age 75, he still lived and worked on his farm acquired by he and his mother some sixty years earlier. He applied for (and it is assumed that he received) a soldier's pension at age 81.

In March of 1861, Loran enlisted as a Texas State Trooper at Brazoria, Texas under the command of Captain W.G. Moseley in a regiment known as the Brazoria Volunteers, Rio Grande Regiment. The majority of the men in the regiment were from Brazoria. The regiment was formed to take part in a military expedition known as the Rio Grande Valley Expedition commanded by Colonel John S. "Rip" Ford in February and March of 1861.

After the Rio Grande Valley Expedition, the men were discharged. Captain Moseley was able to persuade most of his men to re-enlist as Confederate soldiers in the 13th Texas Infantry. The 13th was assigned to guard the Port Of Velasco on the south Texas coast. After the Union Army had captured Galveston, other battles were fought and this unit was present at the recapture of Galveston.

In September of 1861, Colonel Joseph Bates was given command of the Fourth Texas Volunteers Regiment. The Regiment consisted of two field batteries under the command of Captain W.G. Moseley and Captain W.E.Gibson. The command extended from San Luis Pass to Caney Creek.

Civil War action for Colonel Joseph Bates and his men began January 18,1861. Union ships Rachel, Seaman, Midnight, and the Aurther moved near to, and began a bombardment of the Texas Volunteer's headquarters at Velasco which lasted for approximately thirty minutes. Return artillery fire by the Texas Volunteers was so rapid and accurate that the Union Commander of the Midnight reported that the Velasco headquarters was defended by a battery of heavy guns of which one or more had to have been rifled as the Texas guns had near misses of 20 and 6 yards respectively. Actually, the Texans had only one 18 pound (medium artillery) gun.

At sometime during the war between the states, Loran was transferred to Company "C" of the 25th Texas Calvary, under the command of Colonel C.C. Gillespie's Regiment, Confederate State's Army under the command of Captain H.H. Good's Troop. The primary duty of this Calvary Troop was to respond to attempts of Yankee Army invasions into Texas. During this time in 1864 Loron's young son (also named Loron after his father) was born. Loran was honorably discharged from the Confederate States Army in Columbia, Texas on May 23, 1865.

After the Civil War, Loran lived near Houston, Texas. It was said that when carpetbaggers came through, Loran sat on the trunk containing land deeds , but that they were stolen by the carpetbaggers. It has also been said that when Loran died, one of his boys sat on top of a trunk and guarded his gold.

On June 8, 1885 Loran and T.J. Packer sold two acres of land to Loran's son, Lorenza Dowden Hibbard, A.J. Adams and P. Coalson, as trustees with the stipulation that they could have the land as long as they built a house on the land for church and school purposes as part of the bargain. If the church and school was not erected within a reasonable length of time or if erected and then by neglect or non-use resulted in decay of the building and vacated and abandoned, then the land and title would revert back to the grantors, Loran and T.J. Packer.

Loron was talented with his hands and was a carpenter by trade. At age 75 (abt 1902) he still lived and worked on his farm acquired by he and his mother some sixty years earlier. Loron applied for (and it is assumed he received) a soldier's pension at age 81.

The local people called him "Judge". He owned another parcel of land called "Blue Ridge" that later became an oilfield. A pot of gold is buried somewhere in that field. Loran wanted each child to have a cup of gold to build a house. When Loran died, George Andrew and his son Levi went to the house where Loran had lived to divide the inheritance. However, when they arrived, one of the son's of his second wife sat on the trunk that held all the gold and deeds with a gun across his lap and dared anyone to take possession of the trunk. George and his son never returned to the house.

December 10, 1902, Loran wrote a will witnessed by Geo. B. Lang and F.J.Cole: Know all men by These Presents:

That I, L. Hibbard, a resident and citizen of the State of Texas, Fort Bend County, do hereby make and constitute this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking all former Wills whatsoever date. It is my will and desire that all my just and legal obligations shall befully discharged.

I hereby bequeath to each and every [one] of my children named, as follows, to wit: John Hibbard, Jane Hibbard, Levi Hibbard, Andrew Hibbard and Polly Hibbard one head of cattle and an equal interest together in a certain 40 acre tract of land now owned by me in Leon County, Texas. It is my desire that in the division of the land the persons named shall share and share alike equally.

I hereby bequeath unto each and every one of my children named as follows, to wit: Minnie Hibbard, Lorenza Hibbard, Willie Hibbard, Alber Hibbard and Ada Hibbard to be equally divided between them to share and share alike, the following described tract of land being all my holding in the Neel Survey lying on the west side of Stafford's run in Fort Bend County, Texas, being about 60 acres of land more or less.

I hereby bequeath to my children named as followings, to wit: Emma Hibbard, Lorenzo E. (Sam) Hibbard and Dora Hibbard to be equally divided between them to share and share alike all my real estate holdings same being certain tracts of land lying and situated in Fort Bend County,Texas near Stafford's Point in said County, on the east side of Stafford's run herein before mentioned.

I hereby bequeath unto my children named in Article 3 & 4 of this instrument all the residue of my live stock whatever nature after the bequests enumerated in Article 2 of this instrument are fully fulfilled, to be shared equally between them to share and share alike.

I hereby appoint and constitute my son, Lorenza E. Hibbard as my Executor of this my Last Will and Testament to serve without bond or compensation. In Testimony Whereof I have this day, being of sound mind and sound body, cognizant of the uncertainty of life and the certainty of death, signed my name and affixed my seal at Rosenberg, Texas, in the presence of Geo.B.Lang and F.J. Cole, this 10th day of December A.D. 1902.

Signed: L. Hibbard

On August 4, 1904 he and his brother Levi sold two tracts of land in Leon County, Texas to T.D. Hennessy. One tract was 1/3rd of a league known and designated as The Lucius Hibbard Survey, patented October 8, 1845 and the other was 320 acres known as The Lovell E. Hibbard Survey, patented August 1, 1849.

Loran applied for his military pension for service on November 27, 1909 in Ft. Bend County, Texas. He stated that he was discharged at Columbiain Brazoria County, Texas at the close of the war in 1861. He died November 11, 1911 at his residence in Stafford, Ft. Bend County, Texas at the age of 83.

Probate Court records indicate that on July 16, 1913, almost 3 years after his death, that Loran's fourth wife, Mildred Frances (Johnson) Hibbard, a resident of Harris County, Texas filed an Application for Letters of Administration on the Estate of Loron (Loran) Hibbard and stated that real and personal property of $1,000 should be granted to her since she was the surviving wife and was entitled to have a homestead set apart to her and, in addition, that she was also the creditor of Loron (Loran) Hibbard. The document also stated that she was not disqualified by law to act as the administrator of Loran's estate and was entitled to be appointed.

Notices were posted for 10 days at three public places in the county, including the Court House door, that Mildred F. Hibbard had filed an Application for Letters of Administration on the Estate of Loron (Loran) Hibbard which would be heard at the next term of the County Court in Richmond, Texas on July 28, 1913 and that those persons interested in the Estate may appear and contest the application. On August 9, 1913, since the Court had jurisdiction of the Estate, the court documents stated that there was a need for administration upon the Estate, and since the application for letters had been made before four years had elapsed, that Mildred was entitled to letters and was not disqualified. Mildred had a lien on about 3 acres of land in Stafford, Texas, formerly the homestead from the H.P. Hoffman Survey valued at $225.00, 7 acres in the H.P.Hoffman Survey valued at $455.00 and 35 acres in the Wm. T. Neal 1/4 League valued at $1,400.00. In addition there was personal property, a mule worth $15.00 and $291.00 cash in the J.H.P. Davis Bank. This was confirmed on August 28, 1913 by W.B. Cochranand E.L. Tomlinson who were appointed by the court to appraise the estate.

Mildred, administrator of the estate, applied for a Petition of Widow & Appraisement in the County Court of Fort Bend, Texas on October 3, 1913 and stated that she was the surviving widow of Loran Hibbard, was unmarried, in an almost helpless condition without property or means of subsistence, wholly dependent upon the charity of friends for a living and that she had been in such condition since the death of her husband. It was stated that Mildred was very old and feeble, in need of medical attention and that $1,000.00 of the estate's probable value of $2,400.00 would be a reasonable sum to be set aside for her for a year's support.

On May 4, 1914, Loran's son, J.E. Hibbard applied to the court to be appointed administrator of the estate, stating that when Loran died, he left a will which had been filed for probate, but could not be proven on account of the failure to locate the subscribing witnesses. In addition, there were debts that should be paid by the estate, that the will filed for probate was being contested even if it could be proved and that since the land was tillable and would bring in revenue each year if rented or leased. He said that the land was idle and would likely continue to remain idle and non-productive of revenues, that the fences and premises around the homestead needed repair and that it needed to be kept from going to waste. He said that taxes were due and unpaid and no one had the authority to care for and manage the estate and keep it from waste and loss. He also stated that as an heir of the estate, had the part of the estate consisting of his own part and had the part belonging to another son of Loran and heir to his estate, Lorenza E. Hibbard.

W.B. Cochran filed a petition with respect to it being filed less than four years after the death of Loran, that Loran had left a Last Will and Testament December 10, 1902, witnessed by George B. Lang and Fred J. Cole which had been filed and was in the custody of the Court Clerk. He said that by the terms of the will that Lorenza E. Hibbard should be executor and having acquired the interest of Dora Hibbard, one of the heirs of the will, that legal notice of the filing of the application be given, that the will be admitted to probate and declared to be the Last Will and Testament of Loran Hibbard and that no administration on the estate begranted.

The proper public notices were made and on June 10, 1914 Fort Bend County Judge W.I. McFarlane ruled that it would be to the best interests of the estate that someone with authority should take actual possession and control of all the property, whether real or personal, that the real estate should be rented or leased, that the personal property be collected and cared for and that the rents should be collected and taxes paid along with all debts due the estate. He further ruled that the interest of the estate required the immediate appointment of an Administrator and appointed Em. R. Robinson temporary Administrator of the estate with full authority and power to take possession of all the property belonging to the estate for the remainder of the year 1914 and to collect rents, receive payment of all monies due and to pay the taxes due.

The judge also ruled that Mildred F. Hibbard, surviving wife of Loran Hibbard, because of her age and condition and being unable to work and earn a livelihood, who was dependent upon the charities of friends, be granted $15.00 per month for her temporary support out of monies coming into the possession belonging to the estate. Robinson was also appointed to make and keep up repair of the fences and premises sufficient to protect the crops planted and cultivated on the land. For his services he was granted $500.00.

On September 1, 1914, J.E. Hibbard, Alma Hibbard and her husband Harry Fuller filed an objection to the application of W.B. Cochran to probate the will stating that it was unlawful and did not contain facts showing that the proponent, W.B. Cochran was a person who was entitled to share in the estate as a husband, wife, legatee, next of kin or heir. It appeared that he was a mere creditor of Dora Hibbard, one of the legatees of the estate, and not entitled to probate the Will and Testament that he was holding. It was further noted that Loran was married to four different wives during his lifetime and that they were the children of his second wife and entitled to the community interest of their mother in the property owned by their father, Loran Hibbard. They said that no accounting had ever been made of the property and that their interest was never delivered to them, but that their father continued to use and enjoy the property, investing and re-investing without accounting for transactions until he married his third wife, Dora Hibbard's mother.

Another daughter of Loran Hibbard, Ada Hibbard-Packer-Rice and her husband J.D. Rice filed a petition stating that Ada, a legatee of the will offered to the court for probate by W.B. Cochran, was entitled to her share, which was 1/5th of a portion of a 60 acre tract of land lying west of Stafford Run and a part of the Neel Survey near the town of Stafford in Fort Bend County, Texas and also 1/8th portion of the cattle on that land. They joined W.B. Cochran in his petition and ask for the probate of Loran's will. Andrew Hibbard and Jane Hibbard-Deas (Dees) made known to the court that they were the children of Loran by his first marriage and that it would be very unjust and injurious to probate the will. They said that the will purported to have been made in 1902 and by its various provisions shows that the intent of their father was to divide his property equally, share and share alike. They said that their father was very old when he died, in 1912 was eighty-five years old and that he was an ignorant and unlearned man who did not know and had no idea what their statute required in order to cancel a will.

From his declaration in the will, his desire to divide his property equally is shown, but not knowing the necessity of destroying the will he in his lifetime transferred property intended for these heirs. To admit the will to probate would eliminate the children of the first wife out of their share in their father's estate. They said their father had three sets of children by three different wives and that they were the children of his first wife, and to probate the will and cut them out of any share in the estate would be doing just what their father tried to avoid.

At another court session September 9, 1914 on the application of W.B. Cochran to have the will admitted to probate, it was stated that the correct name was L. or Loren Hibbard, but that the will was signed, L. Hibberd. The will was admitted to probate and declared the Last Will and Testament of L. Hibbard. Lorenza E. Hibbard was appointed Executor of the estate. J.E.Hibbard, Alma Hibbard-Fuller and her husband Harry Fuller, Sam Hibbard and George Hibbard gave notice of appeal. One of Loran's sons, John Elmer Hibbard objected to the court granting the application of Mildred F. Hibbard for an allowance in lieu of a homestead, or any allowance whatever. He said because long prior to the death of Loran and shortly after their marriage that she abandoned him in his old age, neglected him and refused to live with him without cause or provocation and therefore forfeited her rights to the allowance. He also stated that there were no funds available to pay the allowance and that she had separate property adequate for her support.

It was ordered on December 8, 1914 that after hearing the evidence and argument, Mildred F. Hibbard's application for allowance was granted for the sum of $400.00 for one year to be paid out of the estate of Loran Hibbard and Lorenza E. Hibbard, executor of the estate.
 
HIBBARD Loran H. (I423)
 
157
Lovell E. Hibbard moved to Texas in 1836, along with his parents Elmer and Lydia Hibbard and his brothers and sisters. They arrived at the mouth of the Brazos River in Brazoria County, Texas in February 1836 from Cincinnati, Ohio. He was a musician who played the fife for General Sam Houston's Texas Army. According to a Leon County document stating he died single without issue (not married or had children).

Land records indicate that on December 23, 1839 he received a Conditional Certificate in Harris County, Texas for 320 acres in the Robertson District, Leon County, Texas about 3 miles southwest from the mouth of Boggy Creek. An Unconditional Certificate was issued for this land on December 13, 1848. On August 4, 1849 he sold 160 acres of the land to Alexander Patrick.

On August 29, 1859 in Leon County, Texas, Alexander Patrick located and carried into patent the Certificate of Lovell E. Hibbard for 320 acres. For his services, he was to receive 1/2 of the land by contract with Lovell. This land was sold on August 4, 1904 by Loren Hibbard and Levi Hibbard to T.D. Hennessy.
 
HIBBARD Lovell E. (I329)
 
158
Luther is found in hte 1870 Illinois census, Warren county, Kelly township. He is 54, a farmer with $15,000 in property and $2400 in personal property. He and Esther have Samuel age 18, Scovill age 14, Fannie age 12, Caroline age 9, Clark age 5 and Charles age 1. All the children were born in Illinois. Luther was born in New York.

He is also found in the Warren county, Past and Present. He is a farmer who had been a postmaster and school director. He had eight children, 4 boys and 2 girls living.

According to the Warren county Portrait and Biographical Album, he was the sone of Luther Hibbard born in Vermont in 1791 and the grandson of Luther Ethemer Hibbard who was an officer in the Revolution. His mother was Sarah Yaw. She died when Luther was two and was raised by his grandmother until her death.

Their first child Edwin died at two months, their second died at four months. Henry Samuel was born 4 July 1852 and dieid 27 February 1883. Scoville L. lived in Kelly township, Fannie was married to William McCulloch. Lucy was a teacher and lived at home. She also was Postmaster for two years. Clark G. and Charles L. were the youngest two children. Clark G. was born 27 August 1865 near Alexis and died in Wisely, Kansas 17 September 1931. He was a dentist in Alexis.

The Monmouth Review of 4 March 1899 reported in the Alexis news that Charles Hibbard and family had moved to Baylis, Illinois on Wednesday where they would make their future home.
 
HIBBARD Luther C. (I2865)
 
159
Married Dec. 17, 1890, per newspaper article in Gwen Hibbard's scrapbook. Article does not specify if they were married in Niagara Falls, NY or Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada. Family bible in Mary Hibbard's possession lists marriage date of Hoyt Hibbard and Mary Swan as Dec. 16, 1890 rather than Dec. 17th .

The North Collins Town Clerk (July 1996) checked entries around 1890/1891 but found NO marriage record on file. (Probably on file in Niagara Falls-NY or Canada?) Jan. 1999: Niagara Falls, NY Town Clerk says they find no marriage record.
 
Family F948
 
160
Mary Hibbard Sledge's family says she was born in 1873. 
HIBBARD Mary (I487)
 
161
Mary married Chappell Sledge. He was a widower with three small boys, who she helped raise. They lost 3 children when they were very young - Chappell, Jr. (age 3), died 7/18/1913, Annie (9 mts), died 7/15/1913, and Cleo (3 days), died 2/19/1915. Chappel, Jr. and Annie died in the same week. Cleo's twin brother, Cecil Burton Sledge, survived.

Mary was a member of the First Methodist Church.
 
HIBBARD Mary (I487)
 
162
Militia. Lieutenant. Enlisted in Captain William Hebard's company. He marched to New London, whence they were driven out, September 6, 1781, at the time of the massacre at Fort Griswold, the taking of Fort Trumball, and the burning of New London.
 
HIBBARD John, II (I692)
 
163
Name Margaret: per her daughter Joyce Plumer, verbal to Mary Hibbard June 10, 1997. Margaret had 7 or 8 children.
 
HIBBARD Margaret (I4006)
 
164
Nathan Fike appears in Austin Colony ledger of land grants and in the reco
rd of the Board of Land Commission of Ft. Bend Co., TX where he was grante
d land and in both instances he states he came to Texas in 1833. Also hei
s listed in the "1840 Citizens of Texas, Vol. 3, Land Grants" by Gifford
White, Austin, TX 1988, as arriving in Texas in 1833 and with a Class 1la
nd grant.

He was a tanner. 
FIKE Nathaniel (I825)
 
165
Nicknames: Angel, Angi, Angelique, Angelina

Hometown: Kenosha, Wisconsin

School: St. Joseph High School, St. Mary's University of Minnesota. Graduated with a BFA Degree in Musical Theatre.

Occupation: Actress

Lived in Appleton, Wisconsin, Mukwonago, Wisconsin and Kenosha, Wisconsin. 
HIBBARD Angela Lynne (I2069)
 
166
Nicknames: J.R., Tommy
Hometown: Fruitland Park, Florida
School: Tecumseh High School
Occupation: Sales
 
HIBBARD John Rondal, II (I2013)
 
167
Obituary for J.E. Hibbard: The Houston Chronicle - Wed., Dec. 2, 1923, pg 13

J.E. Hibbard, 63 years old, died at 7:30 o'clock Saturday night at a local hospital. He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Ola Engleman of Goose Creek and Mrs. Pearl Smith of Galveston; two sons, Oscar H. Hibbard of La Porte and John Hibbard of Washington, D.C., and two brothers. Funeral services will be held at 8:30 Sunday night, at the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. L.D. Hibbard, 414 Birdsall Street, and Monday morning the body will be sent by Settegast-Ropf Company to Stafford for burial.
 
HIBBARD John Elmer (I155)
 
168
Per Gwen Burk verbal 1995 to Mary Hibbard: "There was a second daughter of Enos Hibbard's, she lived in California". Gwen met her a couple of times when she came to North Collins, but can't remember anything else about her. Gwen would have been referring to Clarinda.

Buffalo News 1928 article "From All Corners Of The Land" gave names of Clarinda and her husband, Nash Nye.
 
HIBBARD Clarinda Jane (I2923)
 
169
Per Gwen Burk verbal to Mary Hibbard: Hamilton & Gwen were married at home of Ham's brother and sister-in-law, Harland and Lorraine Hibbard, N. Collins, NY. Gwen Burk's scrapbook: Excerpt: "Nov. 2, 1947: Surprise 27th Wedding Anniversary Dinner given for Gwen & Ham by daughters, Mrs. John Hannon and Mrs. Stanley Stack."
 
Family F1218
 
170
Per Kay Palmer: Book,” Our Country and Its People, Erie County", by Truman C. White, Published 1898, page 245 indicates Harvey Hibbard was grandfather of Enos S. Hibbard.
 
HIBBARD Harvey (I1852)
 
171
Per Tom and Dee Hibbard (verbal to Mary Hibbard Aug./Sept. 1996): DeWitt, son of Thomas Hibbard by a second marriage, also lived for a time with Howard Glyndon Hibbard during the time that Tom, Dee and their mother Helena lived with Howard Hibbard. Tom isn't sure, thought perhaps times were difficult and that was reason DeWitt came to live with Howard.

1870 Brant Census: Dewitt, age given as 17, was a farm laborer living with family of Kimble: James, Julia, Frank and Florence.

Charter member of E.A.U., Jefferson Union, No. 75, instituted Apr. 12, 1880 in North Collins; DeWitt was the Accountant. 
HIBBARD Dewitt E. (I3898)
 
172
Retired due to ill health.
 
HIBBARD Hamilton Ward (I2929)
 
173
School: Antelope Union High School
Occupation: Graphic Artist
Email: muncie@ida.net
 
HIBBARD Carol (I1890)
 
174
She appeared on the census taken circa 1843 Ft. Bend County, Texas. She appeared on the 1870 US Census Texas Precinct 1 #237, Stafford, Ft. BendCounty, Texas living alone. According to the 1900 census, she had three children including John Reilly born in 1875. She died sometime after 1900.
 
HIBBARD Lodema (Ladenia) (I334)
 
175
She was a resident of Jacksonville, Texas and Tecula, Texas and a retired employee of Marja Brassiere Company. She was a member of the Baptist Church.
 
HIBBARD Katherine Mae (I151)
 
176
She was buried in the cemetery in Hanover; which was then part of Norwich, but since 1861 has been part of Sprague, Connecticut. The cemetery is across the street from the Hanover Congregational Church on Main Street in Hanover, Sprague, CT. The Hanover Congregational Church was built eight years earlier in 1761. She was buried in the Hanover Cemetery by the church in Norwich. She is buried on the right-hand side, about halfway in. Her gravestone reads: "In Memory of Mrs. Kezia Bishop, Consort of Mr. Caleb Bishop, who died Jan. 19th, 1770 in the 49th year of her age."

To the left of her grave is a Strong, maybe her daughter's mother-in-law? And to the right of her is Mrs. Abiel Bishop, wife of Elijah Bishop, which is perhaps her daughter-in-law.
 
HIBBARD Keziah (I2446)
 
177
She was mauled and killed by a wild boar when her mother took the children to a spring to bathe them and wash clothes. Kitty, daughter of George Andrew stated that it was a little girl and that she was playing on the porch by herself when a wild hog came along and carried her to the woods and ate her. She was never located, only some of her clothes.
 
HIBBARD Lettie Mae (I491)
 
178
The 1900 census indicates that Hoyt's mother and father were born in NY.

The 1905 census also shows in their household: Gertrude Donahue, 19, Servant, US cit., housework.

Per obit in Gwen Burk's scrapbook: "After marriage in Niagara Falls, they lived on a farm in North Collins. Hoyt managed a Larkin Company store in N. Collins, later became assistant postmaster (2 yrs). Family later moved to Buffalo in 1933 when Hoyt became a Supreme Court Crier. Retired in 1944, then became a clerk in Downtown YMCA, Buffalo."

Hoyt Sr. was Mayor of North Collins 1923-1925, per note rec'd. May 1996 by Mary Hibbard from Jim Hibbard.

Prior to move into Buffalo, her grandparents lived in the home Enos Hibbard built on Main St., N. Collins, known as the "Brick House", per Mary (Hibbard) Stack verbal, verbal 1996.

Barbara Hibbard Collins, daughter of Hoyt Roger Hibbard, Jr. told Mary (Hibbard) Stack, verbal April 1996, her father's middle name was Roger. Dee Hibbard and Roy Welch both thought Hoyt Sr.'s middle name was Rogers. A family bible in Mary Hibbard's possession also shows, under births, the middle name of Hoyt Sr. and Hoyt Jr. to be Rogers. (A later entry, in handwriting that Mary (Hibbard) Stack believes to be that of her grandmother Mary Swan Hibbard, the entry under deaths in the bible lists Hoyt Sr.'s middle name as Rodger.)

Occupation: worker in canning factory, farmer North Collins, Erie County, NY
Occupation: Assistant Postmaster North Collins, Erie County, NY
Residence: N. Collins, NY 1928
Census: 1900 N. Collins, NY
Census: 1925 N. Collins, NY
Census: 1915 N. Collins, NY
Census: 1905 N. Collins, NY
Census: 1880 N. Collins, NY
Census: 1875 N. Collins, NY
Census: 1892 Brant, Erie Co., NY

Note: 1892 census: Hoyt and Mary Swan Hibbard living with Mary's parents, Darwin & Caroline Swan.
 
HIBBARD Hoyt Rogers, Sr. (I2920)
 
179
The following article "Reminiscing" by Helen Feraldi (with Mr. and Mrs. Alfred A. Welsh) appeared in the Tri-County Times. Their niece, Mary Hibbard Stack, is in possession of a copy of the article dated Wednesday, February 16, 1977:

"Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Welch are residents of Main St., Sandusky. They have lived there since selling their farm on Genesee (formerly South) road in 1968.

ANTECEDENTS

Mr. Welch was born in 1891 in Eden Township at Pawntiac Corners. His parents were natives of the area. His forbears are of Scottish descent having left Scotland in 1545, some settling in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. His paternal grandfather, born in 1801, took up land from the Holland Land Company in the Eden area. He lived to be over 96. Mr. Welch's maternal grandfather was born in 1803, Alfred Bushnell Allen; the Bushnell’s were from Connecticut. This grandfather was an adventurous soul who traveled to California to search for gold and, with Sam Sutter, formed the Sutter Company. As a souvenir Mr. Welch has a pony express check, a form of monetary exchange before California was a state. The check has Rt. 2 printed on it to identify the particular pony express route. He also has a faded bulletin published for A. W. Potter, Miner's bookstore, Main St., Nevada listing the Miner's ten commandments. This same grandfather had a brother who was an engineer and built the first bridge across the Mississippi River below Kansas City. Prior to that he built a bridge in Galveston connecting Galveston Island to the mainland in Texas. Thus it was that young Alfred at the age of eight accompanied his grandmother on a two-month trip West when the estates of these gentlemen had to be settled. They traveled by train then changed to stagecoach, their journey including Galveston and terminating at Sacramento. He has memories of a rough, dull, interminable ride in the six-passenger coach drawn by 4 horses, traveling through miles of sagebrush.

HIS CHILDHOOD AND YOUTH

Alfred attended a small, one-room school about a mile from his home until he was about 8 when the family moved into Eden. He has one brother. The school in town served first grade through high school. It is gone now and the present town hall is next to the site. The present centralized school is farther out, built on the land, which was once his grandfather's farm in Eden valley. Al also attended a German Lutheran school with some of his friends who went after school and on Saturday. Therefore, he learned the German language. The teacher, from Leipzig, Germany, was also a preacher and a farmer. At that time Eden was a small village with one general store, a hardware store that handled coal, three churches, Baptist, Lutheran and Methodist, a canning factory, post office, livery stable, Roehler's hotel and a blacksmith shop. Near the Welch farm was a cheese factory. The family moved back to the farm when Alfred was 14. He then rode his horse to the livery stable in town and walked to the school. He had to help with the milking before leaving. One of his pleasures was riding the Morgan horses. Eden was a truck gardening community so the Welch's took produce to market. They loaded the wagon with tomatoes, melons, etc. to sell at the Elk street market. When shipments of bananas came in by carload lots, Al learned one had to be careful handling them because of the banana spiders lurking within the bunches. They were black with yellow legs and a poisonous bite. He knew of one person who was bitten. The Welch's made Limburger cheese and one of Al's chores was the care of the curing process. They were kept on shelves in a separate part of the house and he had to turn them twice a day and rub salt on them. The cheese had to be made with milk with the animal warmth still in it, so they were made twice a day. When Alfred was ten the Pan American Exposition was attracting worldwide crowds in buffalo. Since he had an aunt who lived in the city, it enabled him to visit the grounds several times. The numbers of people, the lights and sounds, the good music one could enjoy at the Temple of Music and the height of the Electric Tower impressed him. He remembers the horse-drawn streetcars of the period that passed as he walked from his aunt's home to the exposition grounds. When President McKinley was shot, Alfred was only about 100 feet away. People ran in all directions, some toward the sound to see what was happening and others away, to get out of danger. He remembers the shock at the idea of a president being shot. Alfred was taking part in a horse showmanship event and the rest of the show was called off that day. The Indian Congress was putting on the event and they lacked enough Indian riders so Al was riding one of the horses in the parade. He had been acquainted with members of the Sioux Indians for years and had become a blood brother through a friend, William Laye, whose grandfather was chief of the tribe. The ceremony of becoming initiated into the tribe involved making a small cut on the upper arm of Al and his Indian friend and mixing the blood. Mr. Welch values this relationship and still has some gifts of Indian workmanship. Al's father ran a sawmill in Eden and several Indians were employed there. Al himself learned to saw lumber at age 14. Eventually he went to study engineering at the Massachusetts school of Technology, which started him on a 63-year career in the building trades.

HER CHILDHOOD AND YOUTH

Mrs. Alfred Welch, the former Helen Hibbard, was born in 1892 in North Collins as was her father before her. Her mother was from Wyoming County. She attended the village grade school, the building now gone, but the present school is on the same site. North Collins in those years was much smaller. There were five in her family; her four brothers are now deceased. Mr. Hibbard went to Buffalo business college and had a varied career. He was an auctioneer, assistant postmaster (Helen's brother was postmaster) a farmer, a juror in the Supreme Court in Buffalo and after retirement he worked in the Y.M.C.A. athletic department. Helen's mother was the second woman to be called to jury duty in Buffalo. The bank of North Collins is on the site of Mrs. Welch's family home. Her grandparents for many years spent winter months in the south. Young Helen spent long visits with them, going to kindergarten in Tallapoosa, Georgia, not far from Atlanta. One time she accompanied her parents on a ride with horse and buggy out into the country. They were warned not to go too far out but they got lost anyhow and the dirt road ended up in a cornfield. When Helen was 12 her grandparents had property in Jacksonville, Florida so she had the opportunity to visit them there. They went by car and she remembers the long bridge crossing the Dismal Swamp in Georgia. She was going to attend school there, but the first day was told she had to be inoculated in order to go. Her father wouldn't allow it. He didn't believe in vaccinations since he'd had an unfortunate experience with one himself and nearly lost an arm. Helen's grandfather bought her a bicycle and she accompanied him on his large tricycle on trips to a farm for fresh eggs. When the ship of the Clyde line docked in town she would run to the wharf as soon as she heard the siren blast. Her grandfather would buy a stem of bananas. When Helen graduated from high school in North Collins she attended Holy Angels, now D'Youville College. In addition to her academic course she took elocution and music. She lived on the grounds and came home once a month. School life was pleasant. She remembers the morning and afternoon walks, lines of students accompanied by the black robed Sisters. For a recital Helen wore a yellow, satin dress made by a North Collins seamstress. Alfred Welch met Helen Hibbard at a Grange dance at Lawton’s. Square and round dancing was popular and they were held at school halls, Masonic halls, and neighborhood homes and in new barns after a rising. Card parties were held regularly.

MARRIAGE

In 1913 they were married at a Buffalo Methodist Church by Rev. Schlenker. They enjoyed a Syracuse honeymoon visiting points of interest in Oswego and Auburn. They remember viewing Auburn prison's electric chair. The young couple stayed with parents until their new home, which the bridegroom was building, was completed. He already had experience in home construction having built a home for his parents the preceding year. He cut the lumber and built a new home for his bride on the main road between North Collins and Eden. Their two sons were born there. They lost their older son at age 12 to polio. Eventually they moved to a house in town. Mr. Welch went to work for Turner Construction, an international company. The firm has recently completed a skyscraper in Chicago. His work took him all over the country. Among the projects were the St. Lawrence University, Van Hornsville, a section was dedicated Madame Curie who came for the ceremony; the Cushing Memorial Hospital in Framingham, Mass.; the Holy Name college in Washington and many well known buildings in cities too numerous to mention. While working on the college Mr. Welch stayed with the Monks of the Franciscan order by special dispensation. Like in a monastery was an education. Working as a construction engineer made Mr. Welch familiar with all facets of life in America. Mrs. Welch traveled with her husband. They rented places in various cities. While in Washington she was given a pass to sit in the gallery and watch Congress in session. One question being debated around the early thirties was the sugar quota. She particularly remembers Huey Long. Her husband had a much closer acquaintance with the leaders of government due to his work. He remembers Lyndon Johnson when he was secretary to the Secretary of State. Among notables with whom he had a personal acquaintance were former vice-president, Jack Garner, Albert Einstein, Joe Kennedy and many others. Mr. Welch has a certificate attesting to his title "Clerk of the Works", making him accountable for all large construction projects in the area including school buildings of Letchworth, Springville and Attica, as well as plants and medical buildings. He is now retired after trying unsuccessfully to retire a number of times. The Welch's once owned a farm in New Hampshire, and then later bought the one on Genesee road. In their present home, Mr. Welch has the basement converted into a shop where he pursues his hobby of constructing and fixing furniture. Since a heart attack two years ago his activities have been greatly restricted. Mrs. Welch is in excellent health, does all her own work and still sews and makes hooked rugs. Both find pleasure in reading and keeping up with current events. Their interest in people and things seems to keep them young at heart and in appearance. It is hard to believe they have been married 63 years. Their son Leroy and his wife, reside in Williamsville. Their (Roy & Rea's) daughter and husband and their two sons also live in Williamsville.
 
Family F1261
 
180
This photo is of Florence and her first husband, Charlie Grimes, date unknown.

Florence had no children. She had two stepsons, J.B. Grimes of Tyler, TX and Cecil Ray of Houma, LA and three stepdaughters, Mrs. Opal Anderson and Mrs. Christine Smith, both of Jacksonville, TX and Mrs. Dorothy Allen of Tyler, TX.

She was a member of New Hope Baptist Church, Jacksonville, Cherokee County, Texas. Her Social Security Number was 460-26-6273 issued in the State of Texas. Her last known residence according to the Social Security Administration was in Jacksonville, Cherokee County, Texas.
 
HIBBARD Florence Angela (I141)
 
181
TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2002
The Senate was called to order by the President.
J.R.S. 136.
Joint Senate resolution of the following title was offered, read the first time and is as follows:
By Senators Lyons, Ankeney, Condos, Leddy, Munt, and Snelling,
J.R.S. 136. Joint resolution congratulating the 2002 Champlain Valley Union High School Crusaders division I championship alpine girls ski team.
Whereas, the 2001-2002 Champlain Valley Union High School (CVU) girls alpine ski team demonstrated a strong mastery of the slopes as it clinched this year’s state championship crown, and
Whereas, all through the season, these young ladies skied with speed, finesse and great enthusiasm, and they were clearly considered contenders for the state championship title, and
Whereas, on championship tournament day at the Bromley Mountain Resort, the team members skied their very best, and
Whereas, scoring for each event, the giant slalom and slalom, is determined by the results of each school’s top four finishers, and
Whereas, based on this formula, as a team, the Crusaders placed third in the giant slalom and second in the slalom, and
Whereas, when all of the scores were tallied, the CVU team had won first place and the Division I state championship, and
Whereas, the teams’ fantastic skiers, Sarah Beal, Kaitlin Bray, Lauren Hibbard, Kat Lawlis, Laura Lewis, Sarah Minkler, Kalee O’Shaughnessy, Lydia Paquette, Danielle Petter, and Ashley Pilla, were significant contributors to this championship season, and
Whereas, Head Coach Rob Engelken and Assistant Coach Rob Margolin taught and motivated these young skiers to speedier descents and smoother landings, now therefore be it
Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives:
That the General Assembly congratulates the Champlain Valley Union High School 2002 Division I championship girls alpine ski team, and be it further
Resolved: That the Secretary of State be directed to send a copy of this resolution to Rob Engelken at Champlain Valley Union High School.
Thereupon, in the discretion of the President, under Rule 51, the joint resolution was placed on the Calendar for action tomorrow.
Bill Passed
Senate bill of the following title was read the third time and passed:

Art Hop 2006, South End Arts + Business Association, Lauren Hibbard of Burlington, VT exibited at Lake Champlain Maritime Museum. 
HIBBARD Lauren (I21507)
 
182
Twin to Bessie Jeanette. Resident of Monroe, LA.

He married Ruby Etta Stewart, widow of his brother Beauregard "Bowie" Hibbard.

He was a member of the First Assembly of God Chruch, West Monroe, Louisiana, a Navy Veteran of WWII, a retired Carpenter, native of Texas and a resident of West Monroe, Louisiana since 1924.

He was also a painter in 1929 in West Monroe, Louisiana and employed by Tennessee & Ohio Railroad.
 
HIBBARD Lessie Eugene (I424)
 
183 " Funeral services for Fenton Starr, who died at his home in Waldo Hills on Friday at the age of 67, were held Monday at the Clough-Barrick Chapel in Salem.
Mr. Starr, who was born Oct. 25, 1892, at Corvallis, was the son of Clarence and Hattie Starr. In 1918 he married the former Faye Hibbard of Silverton. After their marriage, the couple lived at Waldport, where Starr was the Shell Oil Co. distributor until his retirement. The returned to this community 3 years ago and have been living on the No. 1 Donation Land Claim in Marion County, which was originally settled by a member of the Hibbard family.
Mr. Starr was a member of the Masonic Lodge at Waldport. surviving, besides the widow, are a daughter, Mrs. Virginia Burtis of Crescent city, California; his mother, Mrs. hattie A. Starr of Salem; and 2 brothers, Alva Starr of Oakland, California and clyde Starr of Eugene, and 2 granddaughters." 
STARR Fenton (I16375)
 
184 "MOUNT ANGEL-- Memorial services will be at 1 p.m. Saturday in the chapel of Mount Angel towers for Josephine Hammond Rodgers, 91, of Mount Angel, who died Wednesday. Private interment will be in Riverview Cemetery, Portland.
She was born in silverton and taught school in silverton and Estacada. she later managed the coffee shop at Meier & Frank in Portland and worked as a dietician at The Dalles Hospital. Survivors include several nieces and nephews.
Unger mortuary, Mount Angel is in charge of arrangements." 
HAMMOND Josephine (I16380)
 
185 She was a farmer in 1920 in Cherokee County, Texas. She appeared on the 1920 US Census Texas taken 1920 Precinct 3 #464-474, Cherokee County, Texas.

Tommie Bell (McLain) Hibbard, first wife of Lessie Hibbard, told Larry, their son, that grandmother Hibbard (Josie) was a wonderful and sweet person and felt very close to her during her marriage. Josie died on 6 Dec 1949 in Jacksonville, Cherokee County, Texas at age 77 from complications resulting from a fall two months prior to her death. She lived with her daughter, Mrs. J.D. (Mary) Fulton at the time of her death. She was buried on 7 Dec 1949 in Earle's Chapel Cemetery, Jacksonville, Cherokee County, Texas.


From Mamie Sue (Hibbard) Poindexter: "I remember going to Grandmother's (Josie's) house in the summer and how she could fry chicken! Daddy (Joe, Mamie Sue's father and Josie's son) would catch the chickens and ring their necks, clean them and then do what Grandmother did best; fry them, fix smothered potatoes and hot biscuits! Grandmother dipped snuff, but we won't hold that against her! She told my daddy that I sassed her one time when I was about 6 years old. I said I didn't, and she pulled up my dress, pulled out my panties in the back and then spit snuff on me. I was real polite to her after that! But, of course, I always thought I was. Every year for Christmas the kids gave Grandmother a big roll of peppermint candy, snuff and material for dresses and petticoats. She wore about three petticoats at one time" 
JUMPER Amy Josephine 'Josie' (I137)
 
186 "About 1837 Charlotte Snow taught the school in the Hurlbut district (near Cleveland, Ohio) a winter term of 4 months, at a gain of One Dollar per week. During this time her father, Russ Snow, using the main room of the log-house home for a work-shop, made scythe and cradle, snathes and frames, and in the spring he borrowed the $16 his daughter had earned, to iron these to be ready for the market. Thus he secured money with which to pay taxes."

"H. Holland Snow (Russ' second son) also taught the school in the Hurlbut District." 
SNOW Charlotte Louise (I5932)
 
187 "S.M. Hibbard" listed in the Texas Death Index. She died November 21, 1915 in Galveston County, Texas [Record#24431] CUNNINGHAM Sarah Mae (I483)
 
188 (Also known as Mary Bryant) BRYAN Mary (I309)
 
189 (Rev. A.H. Keith) HIBBARD Winfield Scott (I14794)
 
190 , (Section 21 Grave 5032). Source (S00019)
 
191 , Adopted by: James Edward McCarty - Changed name to Chet Edward McCarty. Source (S00031)
 
192 , aka Old Sumnerville Cemetery. Source (S00023)
 
193 , Birdell Church of Christ near Pocahontas, Randolph County, Arkansas, USA. Source (S00035)
 
194 , Book A-16 Page 635. Source (S00034)
 
195 , Born at home. Source (S00024)
 
196 , Born: 13 May 2005
Time: 2:27 am
Weight: 6lb 8.1oz
Length: 21in. 
Source (S00025)
 
197 , Childs Jewelry Store - by John Shivery. Source (S00036)
 
198 , Father - Frank Foulks. Source (S00020)
 
199 , FLINT JOURNAL CLASSIFIED OBITUARY
FLINT
THE FLINT JOURNAL FIRST EDITION
Thursday, January 22, 2004
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
CHASTAIN, Evertt L."Hillbilly" - Age 58, of Lake, MI, died Tuesday, January 20, 2004 at Genesys Hospice in Goodrich. Funeral services will be held at 11:00AM Saturday, January 24, 2004 at the Brown Funeral Home, 1616 Davison Rd., Pastor Harold Gregg and Pastor David Miller will officiate and burial will follow at Flint Memorial Park. The family will greet friends on Thursday from 6-9PM and Friday from 9AM to 9PM at the funeral home. Evertt was born on August 9, 1945 in Arkansas, the son of George and Georgia (Dixon) Chastain. He was united in marriage to Ruthie Bradam on June 12, 1965 in Flint. He was an avid woodworker, hunter and fisherman and was a member of antique tractor pull clubs. Evertt retired from General Motors in 1995. He dearly loved his 2 granddaughters. Surviving are: his wife Ruthie of Lake, MI; daughter, Tammy and Joe Fuhr of Flint; son, Timothy Chastain of Lapeer; grandchildren, Tiffany Fuhr and Sadie Chastain; mother, Georgia of Arkansas; 3 brothers, William Chastain, Jimmy Dale (Lavada) Chastain all of Arkansas, Bud (Becky) Chastain of Indiana; sisters, Doris Ann Jones and Lavon (Stan) Booth of Arkansas; 1 half-brother, Jerry (Janet) Chastain of Arkansas; several nieces and nephews; also very dear friends, Kevin and Karen Crawford and Red and Donna Ball. He was preceded in death by his father, George; grandmother, Effie Dixon and brother-in-law, David.
Copyright 2004 Flint Journal. Used with permission
Copyright 2004 Michigan Live. All Rights Reserved.
Note:
The original read ÏRuthie Bradamon June 12, 1965 in FlintÓ . As this was a typo, the above as been corrected to read ÏRuthie Bradam on June 12, 1965 in FlintÓ.
Jesse Pickrum 26 Jan 2004. 
Source (S00027)
 
200 , From the notes of Jesse Pickrum:
I was at my mothers side when she died. 
Source (S00022)
 

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